LUCY PULVERS

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Lucy was born in Kyoto, Japan and grew up in both Tokyo and Kyoto with her two older sisters, also artists, and her older brother. She was educated in Japanese schools until she moved to Sydney in 2001. Lucy began studying art seriously in 2013 and in 2014, she was awarded the Thea Proctor Scholarship by the Julian Ashton Art School where she continued to study for four years. Lucy paints in both oils and watercolours.

She has been a finalist in the 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 Hunters Hill Art Prize; was a finalist in the 2017 and 2018 Portia Geach Portraiture Prize; and a semi-finalist in the 2018 BP Portraiture Prize held annually at the National Portrait Gallery in London. Lucy recently spent time living in the UK and travelled in Europe, particularly spending time in Germany. This was an intense period of looking at art, as well as painting and drawing while living in London. This period marked a significant evolution in Lucy’s personal artistic style. A large self-portrait painted in oil on linen while living in London was selected for inclusion in the 2019 Mosman Art Prize. A watercolour by Lucy was selected for inclusion in the 207thannual exhibition of the Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours held in the prestigious Mall Galleries in central London. In 2020, three of Lucy’s watercolour paintings were once again selected to be exhibited in the 208th Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours annual exhibition and one painting, a self-portrait was awarded the ‘President’s Choice Award’. Three of Lucy’s works were once again selected for exhibition in 2021.

Lucy is essentially a figure painter and her artistic work is rooted in her relationship to line and drawing as the foundation of all her paintings, both in watercolour and oils. This is one way in which her childhood and on-going relationship to Japanese artistic culture, both traditional and modern, is evident in her work. Lucy’s work is intense, both in line and colour, and is focused on the expression of mood and emotion. In her work, Lucy strives to capture the way the human mind in all its emotional and moral complexity is made visible to the eye.