ALICE PULVERS

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Alice is a full-time professional, exhibiting artist.

Alice was born in Tokyo, Japan and grew up in both Tokyo and Kyoto with her two younger sisters, also artists, and her older brother. She was educated in Japanese schools until she moved to Sydney in 2000 and is bilingual and bicultural in Japanese and English. When Alice was 15, she travelled to Paris, and the art she saw there made a strong and lasting impression on her. She has subsequently travelled in Europe with Sophie, particularly spending time in Germany and again in France. Alice and her two younger sisters painted and drew from a young age; and although the three artists have evolved quite distinct artistic styles, their bond as professional artists continues. While Alice was studying at university she took courses at the Julian Ashton Art School and at COFA in Sydney. In 2012, Alice spent three weeks in Shanghai with Sophie. Alice’s visit to Shanghai and visits to traditional Chinese gardens inspired her to paint a large work in gouache on paper depicting the stone pavements and carvings she saw. 

Alice has been a finalist in numerous art prizes and has been a semi-finalist in the national Doug Moran Portraiture Prize 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. She has also been a finalist in the Hunters Hill Art Prize in 2015, 2016 and 2017 and a finalist in the Mandorla Art Prize in WA in 2015. Recently, Alice has been a finalist in the 2018 Mosman Art Prize, the 2018 Portia Geach Art Prize and a semi-finalist in the 2019 BP Portraiture Prize in London. Alice paints in gouache on paper and also in oils. Her artistic style has evolved over time, but a consistent feature of her work is the inclusion of all manner of animals, birds and plants in her compositions. Alice’s work strongly reflects, in colour and composition, her childhood in Japan, surrounded by traditional and contemporary Japanese art. In her compositions, Alice overlays many layers of colour and pattern, and her works do not generally have a symmetry drawn from the European artistic tradition.